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Religion in an age of science

Author: Ian G Barbour
Publisher: San Francisco : Harper & Row, ©1990.
Series: Gifford lectures, 1989-1990.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ian G Barbour
ISBN: 0060603836 9780060603830
OCLC Number: 20056132
Description: xv, 297 pages ; 25 cm.
Contents: Part One: Religion and the methods of science --
1. Ways of relating science and religion --
I. Conflict --
1. Scientific materialism --
2. Biblical literalism --
II. Independence --
1. Contrasting method --
2. Differing languages --
III. Dialogue --
1. Boundary questions --
2. Methodological parallels --
IV. Integration --
1. Natural theology --
2. Theology of nature --
3. Systematic synthesis --
2. Models and paradigms --
I. The structures of science and religion --
1. Theory and data in science --
2. Belief and experience in religion --
3. Story and ritual in Christianity --
II. The role of models --
1. Models in science --
2. Models in religion --
3. Personal and impersonal models --
4. Christian models --
III. The role of paradigms --
1. Paradigms in science --
2. Paradigms in religion --
3. Paradigms in Christianity --
IV. Tentativeness and commitment --
1. Tradition and criticism --
2. Central and peripheral beliefs --
3. Revelation, faith, and reason --
3. Similarities and differences --
I. history in science and religion --
1. Historical explanation --
2. Story and history in Christianity --
II. Objectivity and relativism --
1. The social construction of science --
2. Third world critiques --
3. Feminist critiques --
III. Religious pluralism --
1. The interpretation of religious experience --
2. Between absolutism and relativism --
3. Conclusions --
Part Two: Religion and the theories of science --
4. Physics and metaphysics --
I. Quantum theory --
1. Complementarity --
2. Interdeterminacy --
3. Parts and wholes --
4. Bell's theorem --
II. Relativity and thermodynamics --
1. Space, time, and matter --
2. The status of time --
3. Order and disorder --
III. Metaphysical implications --
1. The role of mind --
2. Life, freedom, and God --
3. Physics and Eastern mysticism --
4. Conclusions --
5. Astronomy and creation --
I. The big bang --
1. Theories in astrophysics --
2. Theological responses --
II. Creation in Judaism and Christianity --
1. Historical ideas of creation --
2. The interpretation of Genesis today --
III. The new cosmology --
1. Design: the anthropic principle --
2. Chance: many worlds theories --
3. Necessity: a theory of everything. IV. Theological implications --
1. Intelligibility and contingency --
2. Ex Nihilo and continuing creation --
3. The significance of humanity --
4. Eschatology and the future --
6. Evolution and continuing creation --
I. Evolutionary theory --
1. The modern synthesis --
2. Current debates --
3. DNA and the origin of life --
4. DNA, information, and systems theory --
II. Hierarchy of levels --
1. Three forms of reduction --
2. Levels, emergence, and wholes --
3. Sentience and purposiveness --
III. Theological implications --
1. Chance and design --
2. Models of creation --
3. Creation and evolution: three views --
4. The integration of creation and evolution --
Part Three: Philosophical and theological reflections --
7. Human nature --
I. Biology and human nature --
1. Human origins --
2. Sociobiology and cultural evolution --
3. The status of mind --
II. Religion and human nature --
1. The evolution of religion --
2. The Biblical view of human nature --
3. The role of Christ --
III. The human nature --
1. Science and the human future- --
2. Theology and the human future --
8. Process thought --
I. Summary: a multi leveled cosmos --
1. Medieval and Newtonian views --
2. The new view of nature --
II. Process philosophy --
1. An ecological metaphysics --
2. Diverse levels of experience --
3. Science and metaphysics --
III. Process theology --
1. The role of God --
2. God's action in the world --
3. Christian process theology --
4. The problem of evil and suffering --
9. God and nature --
I. Classical theism --
1. The monarchical model --
2. Primary and secondary causes --
II. Some alternatives --
1. God's self limitation --
2. Existentialism --
3. God as agent --
4. The world as God's body --
III. Process theism --
1. God as creative participant --
2. Problems in process theology --
IV. Conclusions.
Series Title: Gifford lectures, 1989-1990.
Responsibility: Ian G. Barbour.
Local System Bib Number:
(Sirsi) u83758
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